Saturday, August 02, 2008

Chicano Student>RE: Obama says he opposes slavery reparations, apology

8-2-2008 @10:42 PM ~ Gracias Chicano Student for your kind reply!
No I do NOT support Democrats simply because they are Democrats. That would be blind and stupid. All is subject to change on quantum-cosmic levels. Real life is often far more complex and beyond simplistic 'either-or' or 'left-right' dualities.

I just think Obama is the best man actually running with a real chance to win the White House. He is a shrewd dude from Chicago remember. If he can pull it off it will be one of the biggest turnarounds in Amerikan political history. He knows how to play issues off each other, absorb from McCain's supporters and keeps his eyes on the prize. He is really a great strategic planner.

The left-wing progressives are so splintered without a strong unified mass third party alternative that it is conceivable that while we bicker ol' McCain could come up and win the White House. He appeals to ol' racist White folks and racists of all colors!

We ~ and I use the term 'we' loosely ~ will need to work with and debate with Senator Barack Obama IF and WHEN he gets ELECTED! What Latinos are talking to his campaign staff now? Is Nativo?

Right now as Latinos we need to voice our priorities , our concerns and our ethnic-racial survival interests. We need to utilize his Campaign in ways that will galvanize those who are generally apathetic to electoral politics in AmeriKKKa.

It is calculating short-term tactical considerations, not a blanket strategic endorsement of the corporate controlled two-headed Monster of the Democratic-Republican political parties. The Green Party is not even effectively in the Presidential Race and the La Raza Unida Party is not even a real player anymore, certainly not on the national level. Third Parties will do better on the local and regional levels.

We must examine factual analyzes of actual conditions, along with their basic connections and interconnections in the context of connected reality. In essence, we must grasp the interconnectedness of it all, including Latin America. A lot of people outside the United States are watching this Presidential race very closely.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
Come Together and Create!
Peter S. Lopez ~ aka:Peta
Humane-Liberation Party
Sacramento, California, Aztlan
Email: sacranative@yahoo.com
C/S


--- On Sat, 8/2/08, chicanostudent@hotmail.com <chicanostudent@hotmail.com> wrote:
From: chicanostudent@hotmail.com <chicanostudent@hotmail.com>
Subject: RE: [NetworkAztlan_News] Obama says he opposes slavery reparations, apology
To: networkaztlan_news@yahoogroups.com
Date: Saturday, August 2, 2008, 11:27 AM

Now what do you think of Obama- he's now in favor of off-shore oil drilling- what other issues is he going to compromised before the Nov. elections, his advisors are telling him to back track on everything- I know I cannot change your mind Pete, but I don't share your unwavering support of the Democrats.

Eugene Hernandez


To: Humane-Rights- Agenda@yahoogrou ps.com; NetworkAztlan_ News@yahoogroups .com; THIRD-WORLD- EARTH-NEWS@ yahoogroups. com
CC: activism-news- network@googlegr oups.com; Activist_List@ yahoogroups. com; issuesonline_ worldwide@ yahoogroups. com
From: sacranative@ yahoo.com
Date: Sat, 2 Aug 2008 07:12:33 -0700
Subject: [NetworkAztlan_ News] Obama says he opposes slavery reparations, apology


http://news. yahoo.com/ s/ap/20080802/ ap_on_el_ pr/obama_ slavery_reparati ons

Obama says he opposes slavery reparations, apology

By CHRISTOPHER WILLS, Associated Press Writer 23 minutes ago

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. - Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama opposes offering reparations to the descendants of slaves, putting him at odds with some black groups and leaders.

The man with a serious chance to become the nation's first black president argues that government should instead combat the legacy of slavery by improving schools, health care and the economy for all.

"I have said in the past — and I'll repeat again — that the best reparations we can provide are good schools in the inner city and jobs for people who are unemployed," the Illinois Democrat said recently.

Some two dozen members of Congress are co-sponsors of legislation to create a commission that would study reparations — that is, payments and programs to make up for the damage done by slavery.

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People supports the legislation, too. Cities around the country, including Obama's home of Chicago, have endorsed the idea, and so has a major union, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees.

Obama has worked to be seen as someone who will bring people together, not divide them into various interest groups with checklists of demands. Supporting reparations could undermine that image and make him appear to be pandering to black voters.

"Let's not be naive. Sen. Obama is running for president of the United States, and so he is in a constant battle to save his political life," said Kibibi Tyehimba, co-chair of the National Coalition of Blacks for Reparations in America. "In light of the demographics of this country, I don't think it's realistic to expect him to do anything other than what he's done."

But this is not a position Obama adopted just for the presidential campaign. He voiced the same concerns about reparations during his successful run for the Senate in 2004.

There's enough flexibility in the term "reparations" that Obama can oppose them and still have plenty of common ground with supporters.

The NAACP says reparations could take the form of government programs to help struggling people of all races. Efforts to improve schools in the inner city could also aid students in the mountains of West Virginia, said Hilary Shelton, director of the NAACP's Washington bureau.

"The solution could be broad and sweeping," Shelton said.

The National Urban League — a group Obama is to address Saturday — avoids the word "reparations" as too vague and highly charged. But the group advocates government action to close the gaps between white America and black America.

Urban League President Marc Morial said he expects hi members to press Obama on how he intends to close those gap and what action he would take in the first 100 days of his presidency.

"What steps should we take as a nation to alleviate the effects of racial exclusion and racial discrimination? " Morial asked.

The House voted this week to apologize for slavery. The resolution, which was approved on a voice vote, does not mention reparations, but past opponents have argued that an apology would increase pressure for concrete action.

Obama says an apology would be appropriate but not particularly helpful in improving the lives of black Americans. Reparations could also be a distraction, he said.

In a 2004 questionnaire, he told the NAACP, "I fear that reparations would be an excuse for some to say, 'We've paid our debt,' and to avoid the much harder work."

Taking questions Sunday at a conference of minority journalists, Obama said he would be willing to talk to American Indian leaders about an apology for the nation's treatment of their people.

Pressed for his position on apologizing to blacks or offering reparations, Obama said he was more interested in taking action to help people struggling to get by. Because many of them are minorities, he said, that would help the same people who would stand to benefit from reparations.

"If we have a program, for example, of universal health care, that will disproportionately affect people of color, because they're disproportionately uninsured," Obama said. "If we've got an agenda that says every child in America should get — should be able to go to college, regardless of income, that will disproportionately affect people of color, because it's oftentimes our children who can't afford to go to college."

One reparations advocate, Vernellia Randall, a law professor at the University of Dayton, bluntly responded: "I think he's dead wrong."

She said aid to the poor in general won't close the gaps — poor blacks would still trail poor whites, and middle-class blacks would still lag behind middle-class whites. Instead, assistance must be aimed directly at the people facing the after-effects of slavery and Jim Crow laws, she said.

"People say he can't run and get elected if he says those kinds of things," Randall said. "I'm like, well does that mean we're really not ready for a black president?"

++++++++++++
Links at website:
http://news. yahoo.com/ s/ap/20080802/ ap_on_el_ pr/obama_ slavery_reparati ons

++++++++++++

Comment: I agree with Obama about reparations. It has been over 200+ years and we ought to get out of the past and accept the fact that reparations are not going to be forthcoming. How can Amerika make reparations for all of its evil deeds throughout its history anyways? By 40 acres and a mule?

We need to continue to work with progressive elements in all sectors of the society of all colors,stripes and leanings, always stress the key importance of mass unity on a global scale and see the picture in its larger global historical context.

Chicanos are not going to get Aztlan back in the real world, though this land was once called Aztlan and originally belonged to its indigenous peoples. Aztlan is a state of mind and being of spirit. Here now these lands belong to all peoples who inhabit it, who sweat upon it and who protect it.

We have to concentrate on the here and now, not bitch and moan about the past, but come together and plan together for the future. In the process, we will all need to rid ourselves of any remnants of racism against any race ~ whether it is hidden in our subconscious or blatant like the KKK. It is the hidden sickness that is harder to cure! We all need to find our real genuine humaneness, beyond race, ethinicity or national borders. Obama for President! Register to vote, register others to vote and get out the vote come Election Day! It's the ballot or the bullet!

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
Come Together and Create!
Peter S. Lopez ~ aka:Peta
Humane-Liberation- Party
Sacramento, California, Aztlan
Email: sacranative@ yahoo.com
C/S



Get more from your digital life. Find out how.
__._,_.___
Monitor: Peter S. Lopez "Peta": sacranative@yahoo.com
List owner: Guillermo Bejarano: aztlannet@yahoo.com

To see and modify all of your groups, go to http://groups.yahoo.com/mygroups
You can subscribe to four (4) groups:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NetworkAztlan_Arte
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NetworkAztlan_News
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NetworkAztlan_Action
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NetworkAztlan_Native-Views
OFFICIAL WEBSITE http://www.NetworkAztlan.com
Yahoo! Groups

Balance your life

by learning how to

make smart choices.

Yahoo! Groups

Everyday Wellness Zone

Check out featured

healthy living groups.

All-Bran

10 Day Challenge

Join the club and

feel the benefits.

.

__,_._,___

Obama says he opposes slavery reparations, apology

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080802/ap_on_el_pr/obama_slavery_reparations

Obama says he opposes slavery reparations, apology

By CHRISTOPHER WILLS, Associated Press Writer 23 minutes ago

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. - Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama opposes offering reparations to the descendants of slaves, putting him at odds with some black groups and leaders.

The man with a serious chance to become the nation's first black president argues that government should instead combat the legacy of slavery by improving schools, health care and the economy for all.

"I have said in the past — and I'll repeat again — that the best reparations we can provide are good schools in the inner city and jobs for people who are unemployed," the Illinois Democrat said recently.

Some two dozen members of Congress are co-sponsors of legislation to create a commission that would study reparations — that is, payments and programs to make up for the damage done by slavery.

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People supports the legislation, too. Cities around the country, including Obama's home of Chicago, have endorsed the idea, and so has a major union, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees.

Obama has worked to be seen as someone who will bring people together, not divide them into various interest groups with checklists of demands. Supporting reparations could undermine that image and make him appear to be pandering to black voters.

"Let's not be naive. Sen. Obama is running for president of the United States, and so he is in a constant battle to save his political life," said Kibibi Tyehimba, co-chair of the National Coalition of Blacks for Reparations in America. "In light of the demographics of this country, I don't think it's realistic to expect him to do anything other than what he's done."

But this is not a position Obama adopted just for the presidential campaign. He voiced the same concerns about reparations during his successful run for the Senate in 2004.

There's enough flexibility in the term "reparations" that Obama can oppose them and still have plenty of common ground with supporters.

The NAACP says reparations could take the form of government programs to help struggling people of all races. Efforts to improve schools in the inner city could also aid students in the mountains of West Virginia, said Hilary Shelton, director of the NAACP's Washington bureau.

"The solution could be broad and sweeping," Shelton said.

The National Urban League — a group Obama is to address Saturday — avoids the word "reparations" as too vague and highly charged. But the group advocates government action to close the gaps between white America and black America.

Urban League President Marc Morial said he expects his members to press Obama on how he intends to close those gaps and what action he would take in the first 100 days of his presidency.

"What steps should we take as a nation to alleviate the effects of racial exclusion and racial discrimination?" Morial asked.

The House voted this week to apologize for slavery. The resolution, which was approved on a voice vote, does not mention reparations, but past opponents have argued that an apology would increase pressure for concrete action.

Obama says an apology would be appropriate but not particularly helpful in improving the lives of black Americans. Reparations could also be a distraction, he said.

In a 2004 questionnaire, he told the NAACP, "I fear that reparations would be an excuse for some to say, 'We've paid our debt,' and to avoid the much harder work."

Taking questions Sunday at a conference of minority journalists, Obama said he would be willing to talk to American Indian leaders about an apology for the nation's treatment of their people.

Pressed for his position on apologizing to blacks or offering reparations, Obama said he was more interested in taking action to help people struggling to get by. Because many of them are minorities, he said, that would help the same people who would stand to benefit from reparations.

"If we have a program, for example, of universal health care, that will disproportionately affect people of color, because they're disproportionately uninsured," Obama said. "If we've got an agenda that says every child in America should get — should be able to go to college, regardless of income, that will disproportionately affect people of color, because it's oftentimes our children who can't afford to go to college."

One reparations advocate, Vernellia Randall, a law professor at the University of Dayton, bluntly responded: "I think he's dead wrong."

She said aid to the poor in general won't close the gaps — poor blacks would still trail poor whites, and middle-class blacks would still lag behind middle-class whites. Instead, assistance must be aimed directly at the people facing the after-effects of slavery and Jim Crow laws, she said.

"People say he can't run and get elected if he says those kinds of things," Randall said. "I'm like, well does that mean we're really not ready for a black president?"

++++++++++++
Links at website: http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080802/ap_on_el_pr/obama_slavery_reparations

++++++++++++
Comment: I agree with Obama about reparations. It has been over 200+ years and we ought to get out of the past and accept the fact that reparations are not going to be forthcoming. w can Amerika make reparations for all of its evil deeds throughout its history anyways? By 40 acres and a mule?

We need to continue to work with progressive elements in all sectors of the society of all colors,stripes and leanings, always stress the key importance of mass unity on a global scale and see the picture in its larger global historical context.

Chicanos are not going to get Aztlan back in the real world, though this land was once called Aztlan and originally belonged to its indigenous peoples. Aztlan is a state of mind and being of spirit. Here now these lands belong to all peoples who inhabit it, who sweat upon it and who protect it.

We have to concentrate on the here and now, not bitch and moan about the past, but come together and plan together for the future. In the process, we will all need to rid ourselves of any remnants of racism against any race ~ whether it is hidden in our subconscious or blatant like the KKK. It is the hidden sickness that is harder to cure! We all need to find our real genuine humaneness, beyond race, ethinicity or national borders. Obama for President! Register to vote, register others to vote and get out the vote come Election Day! It's the ballot or the bullet!

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
Come Together and Create!
Peter S. Lopez ~ aka:Peta
Humane-Liberation-Party
Sacramento, California, Aztlan
Email: sacranative@yahoo.com
C/S

Tuesday, July 29, 2008

About the Green Party and Cynthia McKinney

7-29-2008 @8:48 AM

Gracias Hermano Eugene ~ The Green Party has pretty much fizzled out, though third parties have played largely a positive role in Amerikan electoral politics throughout its history. I was once a registered Green Party Member in 2000 and Voted for Nader. We should remember the results of that fiasco with Fuhrer Bush ~ THE DECIDER ~ stealing the White House with a legal coup-de-etat. The American people should of been up in arms and storming the White House, but they remained tired and sleepy.

Obama has re-energized a lot of people. I am an independent Democratic who believes in the merits of scientific socialism as an alternative economic system opposed to corporate capitalism.

I strongly support Obama in his endeavors to win the White House and help brng about constructive change inside the United Staes in a way that will have a positive impact on the rest of the world, including the huge Third World of Latin America, Asia and Africa.

Our general strategy as a Liberation Movement must encompass a global overview and deep understanding of world affairs. We must go far beyond narrow nationalism, racial politics and ethnic loyalties in order to see the big global picture.

Chicanos-Latinos are in a key strategic geographical and democraphical situation to influence the course of human history IF we seize the time, overcome our internal petty divisions and come together as one people in unity with all repressed peoples inside the United States, including our beautiful Black brothers and sisters, and throughout all of the Third World where the majority of Mother Earth's peoples dwell in poverty and despair.

And the Green Party will not take us there!
Was it not originally a European invention?

We should still listen to and learn from the leaders of third parties but when it comes to the upcoming Presidential Election between Obama and McCain we must fully comprehend the force of connected reality and not screw it up!

Obama has a vague understanding of immigrant rights and the required humane immigration legislation to handle key questions related to immigrants. He is no Messiah, but he will be a lot better for us to dialogue with than Bush has ever been or could ever be.

We must be balanced, realistic and confident of our core values and never abandon our humane principles. How do we survive and meet our basic daily needs? How do we mobilize a mass of people who have been conditioned to fear freedom and dread the truth?
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
Come Together and Create!
Peter S. Lopez ~ aka:Peta
Sacramento, California, Aztlan
Email: sacranative@yahoo.com

C/S
Original Subject:

RE: [NetworkAztlan_News] McCain Admits Problem with Latinos - Still Spins
--- On Mon, 7/28/08, chicanostudent@hotmail.com <chicanostudent@hotmail.com> wrote:

From: chicanostudent@hotmail.com <chicanostudent@hotmail.com>
Subject: RE: [NetworkAztlan_News] McCain Admits Problem with Latinos - Still Spins
To: networkaztlan_news@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, July 28, 2008, 6:19 PM

Thank you for your correction- by the way there is a third candidate running for President-Cynthia McKinney of the Green Party.

Eugene Hernandez



To: NetworkAztlan_ News@yahoogroups .com; networkaztlan_ news@yahoogroups .com; info@hrtnm.org
CC: chicanostudent@ hotmail.com
From: jpena71@comcast. net
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2008 16:14:14 +0000
Subject: RE: [NetworkAztlan_ News] McCain Admits Problem with Latinos - Still Spins

Compañero Eugenio:
Your statement on the American GI Forum is utterly false. In the American GI Forum, we do have a conservative and even some reactionary segments which support John McCain and George Bush, but the vast majority of us support Barak Obama. I and several other American GI Forum leaders moved heaven and earth to try to get Barak Obama to come to the National Convention, but it conflicted with his scheduled trip abroad and no amount of work on our part could bring him in. I worked hard with Brian Colón, our New Chairman of the Democratic Party, and our people in Washington, D.C. and Chicago to get him to include the American GI Forum National Convention in his schedule, and, obviously, he was not able to. We were trying to schedule him to speak before McCain, but we were not able to make it happen. Many of us in the GI Forum are working on the Obama campaign across the country, and we are working with other veterans groups, White and Black, to promote Barak Obama. The American GI F
orum cannot take a position on supporting a particular partisan candidate as an organization, but there are many of us who as individuals are working on his campaign. I had been a strong supporter of John Edwards because of his strong stand on the poor, minorities and affirmative action, and I am glad to see that Barak Obama has now come down on the side of affirmative action and many of his positions are progressive, although some of his stated objectives are still a cause for concern.
Atentamente,
Juan José Peña, State Commander
American GI Forum of New Mexico
Past President, Partido de la Raza Unida Nacional

------------ -- Original message ------------ --------- -
From: <chicanostudent@ hotmail.com>
>
> Sorry Rosalio, that wasn't the case when McCain went before those idiots of the
> GI Forum. From what I read and saw on TV, he was greeted as a hero by those
> right-wing Chicanos. You forget there is a very conservative section of Chicanos
> that won't support Obama under any circumstances.
>
> Eugene Hernandez
>
> To: beajanczak@msn. com
> From: rosalio_munoz@ sbcglobal. net
> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2008 06:27:17 -0700
> Subject: [NetworkAztlan_ News] McCain Admits Problem with Latinos - Still Spins
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Compas
>
> This article below is important in that it emphasises
>
> the very low support overall McCain has with Latinos.
>
> Most articles say Obama has 66%, many say 2 to 1
>
> advantage, but actually bringing out McCains low 23%
>
> the difference is very close to 3 to 1.
>
> There is spin here in a way emphasizing McCains
>
> inability to draw more from Latino Protestants saying
>
> that is his biggest problem
>
> Actually outside of Latino Republicans , 33% of Latino
>
> Non Catholics (the poll didn't use the term
>
> Protestant) in the poll supported McCain. This is
>
> where McCain may be more likely to pick up votes but
>
> his biggest proglems are elsewhere.
>
> Democrat Latinos support Obama 86-6 while Republicans
>
> support McCain 68-23. Families with income of
>
> 30-49,999 support Obama 77-16, Puerto Reicans 73-14,
>
> Less than High School 73-15, Catholics 71-17, Mexicans
>
> 70-21. Even Cubans support Obama in the poll 53-28.
>
> This means that in the key swing states where Latinos
>
> have big votes, New Mexico, Nevada, Colorado and
>
> Florida, McCain has really big problems. Even in
>
> other states like Ohio, Virginia, maybe even McCains
>
> Arizona, the Latino vote could help lead to Obama
>
> wins.
>
> Class is really very key among Latinos, Education,
>
> Economy and Health Care are personal concerns of over
>
> 90%, the war in Iraq and Immigration are far bigger
>
> concerns among Latinos than others scoring over 70%.
>
> I think this indicates Obama has big potential among
>
> working people in general. The immigration question,
>
> though, has big impact as right wing extremism has
>
> hyped up anti Latino sentiment and racism against
>
> citizen and legal resident Latinos and others. RM
>
> .
>
> The McCain-Latino disconnect
>
> By: David Paul Kuhn
>
> July 28, 2008 06:44 AM EST
>
>
>
> GOP strategist Bill McInturff has long emphasized that
>
> earning 40 percent of the Hispanic vote is critical
>
> for Republicans to win. Today, McInturff is John
>
> McCain's pollster, and by his metric McCain has a
>
> serious Latino problem.
>
>
>
> While he earned the support of about seven in ten
>
> Hispanics in his last Arizona Senate race, a Pew
>
> Hispanic Center poll released Thursday shows that just
>
> 23 percent of Latinos intend to vote for McCain in the
>
> presidential contest, barely half of the four in ten
>
> Latino voters who exit polls showed voted for
>
> President Bush in 2004.
>
>
>
> "You have to understand in a way that the Republican
>
> party is damaged among Hispanics," conceded Hessy
>
> Fernandez, McCain's spokesperson for Hispanic media.
>
> "But at the end of day, it's the contrast between Sen.
>
> McCain and Sen. Obama."
>
>
>
> McCain's problem looks to be most pronounced among
>
> Protestant Latinos, who had seemed to be the GOP's
>
> doorway into the Hispanic population. From 2000 to
>
> 2004, Protestant Latinos increased their share of the
>
> total Hispanic electorate from 25 percent to 32
>
> percent, in large part because of Bush's evangelical
>
> outreach and strategic microtargeting of the
>
> community. Even as turnout increased, support for Bush
>
> among the group rose from 44 percent in 2000 to 56
>
> percent in 2004.
>
>
>
> The Pew poll, however, shows that only a third of
>
> Protestant or Evangelical Hispanics intend to vote for
>
> McCain, while 59 percent support Obama — who also
>
> enjoys a 50-percentage- point lead among Catholic
>
> Latinos, long a solid bloc of the Democratic
>
> coalition.
>
>
>
> While McCain and Bush have similar views on most
>
> social issues, including abortion, McCain's candidacy
>
> may mark a return to an era of blue-blooded
>
> Republicans less vocal about their religious beliefs.
>
> Barack Obama, by contrast, speaks comfortably and
>
> frequently about his faith.
>
>
>
> The biggest reason for the shift, though, has been the
>
> heated debate over immigration reform that has
>
> alienated many Hispanic voters previously receptive to
>
> the GOP — and that nearly cost McCain, a co-sponsor of
>
> the bipartisan 2006 immigration reform bill that
>
> inflamed conservatives, his party's nomination.
>
>
>
> In the 2006 midterm election, exit polls showed Latino
>
> support for Democrats had increased by 16 percentage
>
> points from 2004, compared to a six-percentage- point
>
> increase among whites.
>
>
>
> See also
>
>
>
> McCain takes aim at Obama's character
>
> The Streisand interview
>
> Impact of Obama's grand voyage
>
> While McCain's support of the immigration bill — which
>
> was eventually voted down — appealed to many
>
> Hispanics, it infuriated some conservatives. McCain,
>
> his campaign then floundering, promised primary voters
>
> that he had "got the message," vowed to prioritize
>
> enforcement and even claimed he wouldn't have voted
>
> for his own bill it if was to have come up again.
>
>
>
> The shift in tone placated conservatives while
>
> infuriating many Hispanics.
>
>
>
> Luis Cortes, one of Time Magazine's 25 most
>
> influential evangelicals in America and twice an early
>
> Bush backer — in 2000, Bush visited Cortes at his
>
> North Philadelphia office to court his support —
>
> hasn't yet decided who to back this year.
>
>
>
> "I'm going to vote brown," Cortes said.
>
>
>
> "McCain's problem is the problem of his party
>
> demonizing Hispanic people," Cortes said. "His party
>
> demonized us. You can't switch off the immigration
>
> rhetoric and think it will work. In the context of the
>
> immigration issue, Hispanics define the enemy as the
>
> Republican Party and you don't erase that overnight.
>
>
>
> "Bush didn't have to overcome his party's position on
>
> immigration and I think that's the difference," said
>
> Cortes, who heads the Christian social service group
>
> Nueva Esperanza (New Hope).
>
>
>
> The Republican party stance on immigration may not be
>
> clear until the platform is completed, and Cortes said
>
> he may wait to read the platform before deciding
>
> whether or not to leave the GOP.
>
>
>
> "Do the border fence overnight, do it first, fine," he
>
> said. "Then get to work on immigration reform in the
>
> first year."
>
>
>
> Tony Fabrizio, who worked as Bob Dole's presidential
>
> campaign pollster in 1996, emphasized that no single
>
> measure of support is decisive. "McCain can make up
>
> the difference" he said, by increasing his support
>
> among whites,.
>
>
>
> Such compensation is made easier by continued low
>
> turnout among Hispanics, despite many organizations
>
> devoted to organizing the Latino electorate. In 2004
>
> there were 41.3 million Hispanics in the United States
>
> but only 16 million were eligible voters, and only 39
>
> percent of those eligible actually cast a ballot, as
>
> compared to 76 percent of whites and 65 percent of
>
> blacks.
>
>
>
> Hispanics, who made up eight percent of the electorate
>
> in 2004, have remained a white whale of American
>
> politics because of the group's many eligible but
>
> unregistered voters, and the many native-born children
>
> of illegal immigrants who will become eligible voters
>
> at 18. They are also clustered in several swing states
>
> — in 2004, 15 percent of Florida voters and as many as
>
> one-third of the voters in New Mexico were Hispanic.
>
>
>
> On Wednesday, the Obama campaign announced its first
>
> media buy of the general election on Hispanic radio in
>
> Florida, Colorado, New Mexico and Nevada. Obama has
>
> not yet purchased advertising on Hispanic television,
>
> while the McCain campaign has been up for months on
>
> both TV and radio.
>
>
>
> Those ads, though, have yet to move his numbers much.
>
> Both Gallup and Pew show his support to be fairly
>
> steady at and 10 percentage points less than Bush's in
>
> the summer of 2004.
>
>
>
> "You begin with the anti-immigrant legislation that
>
> came out of the House and jump started a level of
>
> activism in the Latino community that we had not seen
>
> ever," said Adam Segal, director of the Hispanic Voter
>
> Project at Johns Hopkins University "and you add to
>
> that the favorable political environment for Democrats
>
> in general," and it's hard, he said, to see McCain's
>
> numbers among Hispanics improving.
>
>
>
> "This cycle is extremely favorable to Obama and the
>
> Democrats," Segal, who then paused before emphasizing
>
> "extremely."
>
>
>
> © 2008 Capitol News Company, LLC
>
___________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _____
> With Windows Live for mobile, your contacts travel with you.
> http://www.windowsl ive.com/mobile/ overview. html?ocid= TXT_TAGLM_ WL_mobile_ 072008


--Forwarded Message Attachment--
From: chicanostudent@ hotmail.com
To: networkaztlan_ news@yahoogroups .com
Subject: RE: [NetworkAztlan_ News] McCain Admits Problem with Latinos - Still Spins
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2008 15:30:17 +0000

Sorry Rosalio, that wasn't the case when McCain went before those idiots of the GI Forum. From what I read and saw on TV, he was greeted as a hero by those right-wing Chicanos. You forget there is a very conservative section of Chicanos that won't support Obama under any circumstances.

Eugene Hernandez


To: beajanczak@msn. com
From: rosalio_munoz@ sbcglobal. net
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2008 06:27:17 -0700
Subject: [NetworkAztlan_ News] McCain Admits Problem with Latinos - Still Spins

Compas
This article below is important in that it emphasises
the very low support overall McCain has with Latinos.
Most articles say Obama has 66%, many say 2 to 1
advantage, but actually bringing out McCains low 23%
the difference is very close to 3 to 1.
There is spin here in a way emphasizing McCains
inability to draw more from Latino Protestants saying
that is his biggest problem
Actually outside of Latino Republicans , 33% of Latino
Non Catholics (the poll didn't use the term
Protestant) in the poll supported McCain. This is
where McCain may be more likely to pick up votes but
his biggest proglems are elsewhere.
Democrat Latinos support Obama 86-6 while Republicans
support McCain 68-23. Families with income of
30-49,999 support Obama 77-16, Puerto Reicans 73-14,
Less than High School 73-15, Catholics 71-17, Mexicans
70-21. Even Cubans support Obama in the poll 53-28.
This means that in the key swing states where Latinos
have big votes, New Mexico, Nevada, Colorado and
Florida, McCain has really big problems. Even in
other states like Ohio, Virginia, maybe even McCains
Arizona, the Latino vote could help lead to Obama
wins.
Class is really very key among Latinos, Education,
Economy and Health Care are personal concerns of over
90%, the war in Iraq and Immigration are far bigger
concerns among Latinos than others scoring over 70%.
I think this indicates Obama has big potential among
working people in general. The immigration question,
though, has big impact as right wing extremism has
hyped up anti Latino sentiment and racism against
citizen and legal resident Latinos and others. RM
.
The McCain-Latino disconnect
By: David Paul Kuhn
July 28, 2008 06:44 AM EST

GOP strategist Bill McInturff has long emphasized that
earning 40 percent of the Hispanic vote is critical
for Republicans to win. Today, McInturff is John
McCain's pollster, and by his metric McCain has a
serious Latino problem.

While he earned the support of about seven in ten
Hispanics in his last Arizona Senate race, a Pew
Hispanic Center poll released Thursday shows that just
23 percent of Latinos intend to vote for McCain in the
presidential contest, barely half of the four in ten
Latino voters who exit polls showed voted for
President Bush in 2004.

"You have to understand in a way that the Republican
party is damaged among Hispanics," conceded Hessy
Fernandez, McCain's spokesperson for Hispanic media.
"But at the end of day, it's the contrast between Sen.
McCain and Sen. Obama."

McCain's problem looks to be most pronounced among
Protestant Latinos, who had seemed to be the GOP's
doorway into the Hispanic population. From 2000 to
2004, Protestant Latinos increased their share of the
total Hispanic electorate from 25 percent to 32
percent, in large part because of Bush's evangelical
outreach and strategic microtargeting of the
community. Even as turnout increased, support for Bush
among the group rose from 44 percent in 2000 to 56
percent in 2004.

The Pew poll, however, shows that only a third of
Protestant or Evangelical Hispanics intend to vote for
McCain, while 59 percent support Obama — who also
enjoys a 50-percentage- point lead among Catholic
Latinos, long a solid bloc of the Democratic
coalition.

While McCain and Bush have similar views on most
social issues, including abortion, McCain's candidacy
may mark a return to an era of blue-blooded
Republicans less vocal about their religious beliefs.
Barack Obama, by contrast, speaks comfortably and
frequently about his faith.

The biggest reason for the shift, though, has been the
heated debate over immigration reform that has
alienated many Hispanic voters previously receptive to
the GOP — and that nearly cost McCain, a co-sponsor of
the bipartisan 2006 immigration reform bill that
inflamed conservatives, his party's nomination.

In the 2006 midterm election, exit polls showed Latino
support for Democrats had increased by 16 percentage
points from 2004, compared to a six-percentage- point
increase among whites.

See also

McCain takes aim at Obama's character
The Streisand interview
Impact of Obama's grand voyage
While McCain's support of the immigration bill — which
was eventually voted down — appealed to many
Hispanics, it infuriated some conservatives. McCain,
his campaign then floundering, promised primary voters
that he had "got the message," vowed to prioritize
enforcement and even claimed he wouldn't have voted
for his own bill it if was to have come up again.

The shift in tone placated conservatives while
infuriating many Hispanics.

Luis Cortes, one of Time Magazine's 25 most
influential evangelicals in America and twice an early
Bush backer — in 2000, Bush visited Cortes at his
North Philadelphia office to court his support —
hasn't yet decided who to back this year.

"I'm going to vote brown," Cortes said.

"McCain's problem is the problem of his party
demonizing Hispanic people," Cortes said. "His party
demonized us. You can't switch off the immigration
rhetoric and think it will work. In the context of the
immigration issue, Hispanics define the enemy as the
Republican Party and you don't erase that overnight.

"Bush didn't have to overcome his party's position on
immigration and I think that's the difference," said
Cortes, who heads the Christian social service group
Nueva Esperanza (New Hope).

The Republican party stance on immigration may not be
clear until the platform is completed, and Cortes said
he may wait to read the platform before deciding
whether or not to leave the GOP.

"Do the border fence overnight, do it first, fine," he
said. "Then get to work on immigration reform in the
first year."

Tony Fabrizio, who worked as Bob Dole's presidential
campaign pollster in 1996, emphasized that no single
measure of support is decisive. "McCain can make up
the difference" he said, by increasing his support
among whites,.

Such compensation is made easier by continued low
turnout among Hispanics, despite many organizations
devoted to organizing the Latino electorate. In 2004
there were 41.3 million Hispanics in the United States
but only 16 million were eligible voters, and only 39
percent of those eligible actually cast a ballot, as
compared to 76 percent of whites and 65 percent of
blacks.

Hispanics, who made up eight percent of the electorate
in 2004, have remained a white whale of American
politics because of the group's many eligible but
unregistered voters, and the many native-born children
of illegal immigrants who will become eligible voters
at 18. They are also clustered in several swing states
— in 2004, 15 percent of Florida voters and as many as
one-third of the voters in New Mexico were Hispanic.

On Wednesday, the Obama campaign announced its first
media buy of the general election on Hispanic radio in
Florida, Colorado, New Mexico and Nevada. Obama has
not yet purchased advertising on Hispanic television,
while the McCain campaign has been up for months on
both TV and radio.

Those ads, though, have yet to move his numbers much.
Both Gallup and Pew show his support to be fairly
steady at and 10 percentage points less than Bush's in
the summer of 2004.

"You begin with the anti-immigrant legislation that
came out of the House and jump started a level of
activism in the Latino community that we had not seen
ever," said Adam Segal, director of the Hispanic Voter
Project at Johns Hopkins University "and you add to
that the favorable political environment for Democrats
in general," and it's hard, he said, to see McCain's
numbers among Hispanics improving.

"This cycle is extremely favorable to Obama and the
Democrats," Segal, who then paused before emphasizing
"extremely."

© 2008 Capitol News Company, LLC




__._,_.___
Monitor: Peter S. Lopez "Peta": sacranative@yahoo.com
List owner: Guillermo Bejarano: aztlannet@yahoo.com

To see and modify all of your groups, go to http://groups.yahoo.com/mygroups
You can subscribe to four (4) groups:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NetworkAztlan_Arte
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NetworkAztlan_News
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NetworkAztlan_Action
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NetworkAztlan_Native-Views
OFFICIAL WEBSITE http://www.NetworkAztlan.com
Give Back

Yahoo! for Good

Get inspired

by a good cause.

Y! Toolbar

Get it Free!

easy 1-click access

to your groups.

Yahoo! Groups

Start a group

in 3 easy steps.

Connect with others.

.

__,_._,___